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ADHD

Co-Occurring Disorders in Teens: Bipolar Disorder - The Great Imitator

Angry outbursts, erratic sleep patterns, sudden mood swings, and changes in personality. If you’re a parent of a teenager, these behaviors can be the status quo—actually, we often take these behaviors for granted. When teens are in trouble, when they are struggling to cope with issues that are too difficult for them to handle, drinking or getting high makes these behaviors worse often to the point of frightening us.

Symptoms of substance misuse often mimic other behaviors and make it hard to figure out exactly what’s going on in kids who are getting high. We know that kids (and adults) get high to help manage the difficult emotions associated with life’s challenges. And we know that adolescence presents them (and us!) with unique challenges.

Your parental instinct that something is wrong is often correct, but understanding the difference in the root causes of their erratic behavior will help you decide what course to take with your child.

Sometimes the issues are normal external pressures, like arguments with friends, academic expectations, real or perceived rejections by others.

My Participation in ADHD Expert Roundtable

by Barry Lessin

November 29th, 2010

I recently had the opportunity to participate as an expert contributor to an online "roundtable discussion" of ADHD at Everydayhealth.com, the major website of Everyday Health, Inc., a leading online health company.

The bewildering array of information available about ADHD combined with the confusing set of symptoms and behaviors that are often seen in children with ADHD make it difficult for parents to decide what direction to take when there's concern that your child may have ADHD.

The multidisciplinary panel I was a part of had a chance to answer some important questions that will help you make better decisions about getting help for your child.

Here's a link to the Everydayhealth.com roundtable.

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