Skip to content

College is a Part of Life; It's Not Apart From Life

Getting a college degree is an impressive accomplishment that any person can be proud of.

Unfortunately, the faulty expectations that are part of the "mystique" of college life--"These will be the best years of your life!"--undermine the success of many kids' adjustment to college, leaving behind a long line of depressed, anxious, alcohol- and drug-abusing kids.

Many kids hit a wall when they get to college, mostly because they're not prepared for what are the normal challenges of this phase of life that college presents. Yes, it's normal-- no, there's nothing wrong with you!--if you struggle with establishing a life separate from your parents, family, lifelong friends and supports.

Confronting brand new academic, financial, and social pressures that the college experience brings is hard enough for any child, let alone with those with acknowledged learning and/or emotional problems. "Changes of scenery" and "getting away from mom and dad" are not part of a good plan for kids already struggling to manage their anxiety, depression, and/ADHD.

A recent Huffington Post article by Meg Schneider points out that, yes, going away to college offers the possibility of growth and positive change, but it's naive to believe that old challenges can just be erased.

Meg offers many excellent realistic suggestions for embracing the opportunities offered in college that will improve the chances of a successful college experience. Her main message is one of normalizing the college experience, and I love how she describes it: "College is a part of life. It's not apart from life". Perfectly stated.

If your child is unhappy at college, it's crucial to have him/her ask for help. It doesn't mean that there's something wrong with him or her. Getting that diploma may involve a few detours or pit stops along the way, including a few at a counselor's office. It's a normal part of the journey to that impressive graduation milestone. 

glqxz9283 sfy39587stf01